0%

Recruiter Late For A Phone Interview?

Many companies utilize phone screenings or interviews before inviting a candidate in for a face-to-face, in-person interview.  This is typically done to get to know the candidate better and to only invite the most serious, qualified candidates into the office.  But, what should you do if the recruiter late for a phone interview?

However, sometimes the recruiter or hiring manager is late to join the call.  You may sit around wondering if you have the correct time or if they’ve simply gone with another candidate.  You may be tempted to call, email, or text the recruiter, but aren’t sure what the proper procedure or formality is.

When a recruiter or hiring manager is late for a phone screening or interview, it is best to always give them ample time to call you or join the conference line.  Ample time is generally fifteen minutes or so past the scheduled interview time.

So, if you have a phone screening or call set for 2:00 PM, then you can consider reaching out to them at or around the 2:15 PM mark.

However, you should do so carefully, professionally, and in a considerate manner.  The method you decide to reach out to them should be the one you stick with and you should not barrage them with a slew of messages and phone calls.

Verify, Verify, Verify

Before you reach out, you should continue to check your emails and confirm that the recruiter or hiring manager did not send you an update.  We’re all human and sometimes things outside our control can affect our day and our scheduled meetings.  Make sure you check your email and your spam folder to see if they did try to reach out to you.

From there, make sure that you have sufficient cell service and signal and are able to get and receive phone calls.  You don’t want the recruiter to have attempted to call you but been unable to due to poor cell signal.

In addition, before you reach out to the recruiter, make sure that the information you provided was correct and accurate.  Did you give them the correct cell or home number?  Did you verify the date and time for the call and the time zone?  Go over your previous communication and verify that you sent everything correctly.

Initial Outreach

If it has been fifteen minutes and you’ve verified the information you sent and confirmed that you have appropriate cell signal, then you can make an initial outreach.  The best outreach method is a phone call.  This will allow for you to discuss with the recruiter or hiring manager how they would like to proceed immediately.  Text and email can be unreliable and may get lost in the queue, especially if they are having an unexpected emergency.

If the recruiter or hiring manager doesn’t answer the phone, be sure to leave a voicemail.  Indicate that you were following up for your scheduled call and provide times when you are available for them to call you back.

Secondary Outreach

After you make the call, if you did not get an answer, feel free to send a polite and professional email.  Indicate that you were waiting for their call but would like to schedule another one.  Provide dates and times you are available.

Be professional in your email and don’t be aggressive or frustrated.  You don’t know why they weren’t able to make the scheduled call and you don’t want to burn any bridges or opportunities.

Final Outreach

 The final outreach should only be done if you have not heard back from the recruiter or hiring manager 48-hours after your originally scheduled interview.  At that time, feel free to send one FINAL email, following-up.

You should be professional but stern in your email.  Indicate that you had not heard back but are still interested in the position.  Provide a few dates and times that you are available.

Next Steps

If after three attempts at setting a new time to hold the phone interview and you have not gotten a response back, I would remove myself from consideration at the company.  You do not need to send any further communication; however you should regroup with yourself and continue to apply to other positions.

Though it may be frustrating, take it as a blessing in disguise.  You don’t want to work at a company that disregards set schedules and appointments anyway.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Scroll to Top